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Online, small group training for therapists

December 18, 2017

One of my biggest passions right now is to nurture and mentor therapists looking to grow their confidence in working with children who experienced early, complex, developmental, attachment trauma.  I absolutely ADORE this population (and their parents) and know there are a lot of therapists out there who feel like they are floundering with these complex, highly dysregulated (or completely shut-down) children.

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I also know that it can be a real challenge to access affordable, high quality training- especially therapists who live in less populated areas.

So I’m figuring out a way to solve those problems!

In January 2018, I’m launching a small-group training series “Bridges to Play Therapy”– which seeks to build bridges between play therapists and relational neuroscience, attachment theory, and interpersonal neurobiology.

My first group in this series is “Regulating the Brainstem in Play Therapy using Movement, Music, and Play.” 

The group is limited to 10 therapists and there are FOUR spots remaining as of 12/18/2017.

We will meet on Thursday mornings, from 10:15 to 11:45 (central time) via a HIPAA compliant video program.  This entire program will be held ONLINE in a small group format that will encourage and support discussion.

All of the details are available on my website.  Are you interested in the group but prefer an evening option?  I’m compiling a waiting list of therapists interested in a Tuesday evening, 8 – 9:30pm central time option.  Send me an email!!

CLICK HERE for more details, including registration.

Always in gratitude,

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Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

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Grief in Adopted Children

December 6, 2017

During my career, I’ve listened closely to adopted people- children and adults- both in and out of the therapy room.  Usually 80% of my therapy practice is comprised of adopted children and their adoptive parents or adults somewhere on the adoption triad.  For years and years, I was heavily involved with Adoption Knowledge Affiliates, an adoption non-profit education and support group that supports the entire adoption triad.  By showing up with an open heart and a curious mind, I have grown to learn much about the experience of adoption.

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We’ve also seen great advances in neuroscience in the past decade and are able to collect data about what has always been deeply felt and known by those living adoption.

Adoption and grief cannot be separated out.  Grief is inherent in adoption.  Adoption ALWAYS begins with a tragic loss.

In general, our culture doesn’t do grief very well.  But we especially struggle with ambiguous grief- when the person is gone but not dead, or when the person isn’t gone but is no longer the same (such as after a traumatic brain injury or dementia).

All hard things are tackled more easily inside connection and relationship- so I’m offering this webinar on grief, hoping we can explore the inevitability of grief in adoption TOGETHER.  In connection and relationship.

Adoption grief is sad.  Sometimes it becomes scary, confusing, and overwhelming.  But it doesn’t have to.  We can learn to do grief well.  To recognize it, make space for it, and support it.  We can’t take it away.  But we can BE with it.  And being with eases the pain and allows the hard feeling to move through.

This is a heavy topic but we can do hard things together.  And if you’ve been in a webinar with me before, you know it will probably be fun.

For all the details, including registration, CLICK HERE.

Be brave.  Come with me.

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Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

Play Therapy with the Brain in Mind

November 9, 2017

You’ve been asking- it’s finally here!  Webinars for therapists- with CEUs!!

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I’m so excited to begin offering distance training opportunities for therapists working with children!

***This training is sponsored by Marshall Lyles, LPC-S, LMFT-S, RPT-S.  Marshall Lyles, LPC-S, LMFT-S, RPT-S is an APT Approved Provider: 17-508.  APT Non-Contact CEUs are offered to participants who purchase the recording of the webinar and successfully complete the online quiz.***

 

Play Therapy with the Brain in Mind will be an introductory look at harnessing the power of relational neuroscience in our therapeutic work with children.  In one hour, we’ll cover:

  1. The definition of triune brain (and why this matters)
  2. The sequence of brain development (and why this matters)
  3. How our clients assess for safety in the therapy room (and why safety matters)
  4. What does ‘regulation’ really mean and why is this important in therapy
  5. How to change implicit memory/mental models

Whew!!!  That’s a LOT!

Please head over to the official webinar description and registration page for webinar description and objectives.

This webinar is FREE if you attend live on Thursday December 7 at 11:30am central time.

If you can’t make it during that time, or if you want one non-contact APT ceu, you can purchase access to the recording for only $10!!!

Sound good?

Please read ALL the details – including the official description, objectives, and cancellation policy- and then easily sign up by heading over to my website!

https://www.gobbelcounseling.com/webinars-for-therapists

This is the just the beginning!  I’ll be launching a more in-depth online training opportunity in the next week or so.  Stay tuned!!

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Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

All Behavior is Adaptive

November 6, 2017

In April 2015 I sat in the back of a large hotel ballroom with some dear friends at the Texas Association for Play Therapy Conference.  My husband was out of town for the weekend and I had hired a baby-sitter so I could attend the conference- something I had never done before.  I was NOT going to miss the opportunity to spend two days with Bonnie Badenoch, a brilliant expert in relationships and Interpersonal  Neurobiology.

All Behaviors are Adapative

Loud and clear, on day one, Bonnie stated “All behavior is adaptive.”

I was already familiar with Bonnie Badenoch.  I’d read her books and participated in a pretty intensive three-day retreat a few months prior.  But all behavior is adaptive?  This was new to me.

In all my studying and training to work with children with pretty intense behaviors, my mentors and consultants had always used the word ‘maladaptive’ to describe the lying, stealing, manipulation, and sexually acting out behaviors that were so stressful to their parents.

I liked the word ‘maladaptive.’  I thought it made clear that at one point the behavior was adaptive- it had been learned and developed for a really great reason.  It just wasn’t adaptive anymore.  This perspective usually brought up compassion in parents and helped us understand the root cause, making it easier to address.  It was my job to help kids find behaviors that could more appropriately get their needs met.

Adaptive?  How could the tantrums be adaptive?  The food hoarding?  The control? These behaviors were hurting these kid’s relationships and not actually getting them what they needed.

I went home that night and called a friend to hash this out.  Adaptive??  How could this be???

Yet I was curious.  I trusted Bonnie Badenoch.  I wanted to understand her perspective.

I dove in.  I studied.  I explored.  I got curious.  And I’ve landed on a truth that informs the way I do therapy.  In any given moment, we only behave in a way we feel we must in order to meet a need.

Humans are complex systems, and our systems know what we need.  When we are safe enough to drop a protector, we will.  Until then, all behavior is adaptive.  It all meets a need.

The need might be hard to understand.  It might be to avoid feeling an unbearable feeling.  Shame.  Aloneness.  Despair.  But not understanding what the need is doesn’t mean that the need doesn’t exist.  We can be certain it does.

We are all a complex system of parts and protectors.  My manipulative part is only forward when it feels it needs to be manipulative in order to get a need met.

This part might not actually be right (meaning, a different approach might get my need met).  But it BELIEVES it is right.  In that moment, as far as I’m concerned, the behavior is adaptive.  It believes that it’s not safe to risk trying something new (being straight forward instead of using manipulation).  This part keeps me safe.  It’s adaptive.

My husband might not find it adaptive, but that’s beside the point right now 🙂

When I’m confident in this belief- that all behavior is adaptive- I will stop trying to change behaviors (mine and my clients).

Instead I can focus more on creating a space of safety, welcoming all parts with curiosity, so that it becomes safe to risk trying something new.

This does not mean that I am permissive about bad behavior.  I can set a compassionate boundary- place a limit- and do so without judgment because I believe all behavior is adaptive.  I also believe I have a right to be physically and emotionally safe and to be treated with respect.  I can hold both truths together at the same time.

If all behavior is adaptive, I’m forced to stay in a place of curiosity.  The behaviors sometimes feel baffling and confusing.  But if I’m committed to this belief that it must be adaptive, I am committed to curiosity about why.  I am committed to gratitude for all my client’s parts and protectors- even the ones that are realllllllly hard to be with, or realllllllllly triggering.

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Over the past few weeks I’ve been on a journey to solidify the core beliefs that guide my work in the therapy room. This is post #3.

You might also want to check out:

All True Selves are Loveable

We are Always Moving Toward Healing

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Don’t forget to check out my upcoming training for therapists and helpers on how to incorporate Movement & Music into work with children with complex trauma- encouraging healing from the bottom up.  

Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

We Are Always Moving Toward Healing

October 30, 2017

We each have an intrinsic push toward integration- or the subjective experience of wholeness- in our neural circuitry.  Bonnie Badenoch, “Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology.”

Always Moving toward Healing

We are all ALWAYS moving toward healing.

All True Selves are Loveable.

Two of my foundational beliefs in the therapy room.  Well really, in my life- but it’s a lot easier to sink into these truths in the comfort of my therapy room.

There are some days when I am so confused, so baffled by what is happening with my clients that I all I can do is surrender to the truth that our systems are always moving toward healing.

In fact, I have come to understand that when I move into a place of believing I know exactly what to do next is precisely when I need to back up- because I have lost my curiosity.  And in order to move toward integration, my clients need me to stay in a place of curiosity.  When they feel anchored in my curiosity, their system will unveil the next step on the path.

As a therapist, I can help to co-create a space with my clients in which they are invited to move toward integration. But I do not have the map.

I do not think I could adequately explain to you how difficult this can be.  Clients- and their parents- want me to have the map.  They feel so lost, so alone, and so afraid.  It can feel terrifying to discover that I don’t believe I have the map.  But I also believe that it is in this moment, when they join with someone who is willing to stumble along in the dark with them, uncertain of the next step but trusting that it will emerge, that the part of them that is already moving toward healing feels it can risk being seen.

When we’ve been harmed inside relationship the way my clients have been harmed, we develop what can feel like an infinite number of protectors.  These protectors are terrified to step back and allow our most wounded parts to be seen.

I trust those protectors.  I trust that they know when it’s time to take a step back.  Because the system is always moving toward healing.

This belief doesn’t mean that I sit in my chair and do nothing, trusting the client to forge their own way.  Oh no.  I play an active role in this dance with my clients.  I show up.  I bring my whole self.  I have ideas about what might be helpful.  Sometimes I’ve VERY active- planning a whole session in advance.  But even when I have a Theraplay session planned in advance from top to bottom, I hold this in a place of believing that ultimately my client knows the way.  So when my best laid plans go horribly awry (and oh, do they ever…) it’s OK.  My client will show me the way and I’ll go with them.

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Don’t forget to check out my upcoming training for therapists and helpers on how to incorporate Movement & Music into work with children with complex trauma- encouraging healing from the bottom up.  

Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

Healing Trauma from the Bottom Up

October 22, 2017

After this training sold out back in June 2017, I immediately began making plans to host it one last time here in Austin, TX.  We had SO MUCH FUN!!!!!

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I developed Movement & Music in Play Therapy: Healing Trauma from the Bottom Up to help therapists who feel confused, stuck, or overwhelmed by those most dysregulated children in the playroom.

With a focus on regulation from the ‘bottom up’ we are going to move, dance and play all day long.  AND you’ll walk away with an understanding of the science so you’ll feel confident in the room and be able to explain what you are doing to skeptical parents.  This science-supported training leans on the research and teaching of Daniel Siegel, Stephen Porges, Bruce Perry, and Allan Schore.

WHEN: November 11, 2017

WHERE: 6301 Woodrow, Austin, TX 78756

FEE: $175 (register before midnight on October 27)

$190 (registration after October 28)

CEUs: 6, including APT

For more details and to register, head over to the registration page!

www.MovementInPlayTherapy.EventBrite.com

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Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my monthly (or less) newsletter!

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

All True Selves are Loveable

October 16, 2017

I’ve never met a true self I haven’t fallen in love with. 

~Candyce Ossefort Russell, LPC-S

My life literally changed the moment I heard those word.  September 2015.

Our true selves are always here (though they may be covered up with 40 million protectors).

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Recently I’ve been attempting to organize my approach to therapy into a strong theoretical foundation, laying into it the different trainings, tools, and techniques I have, being curious about how it all…if it all…fits together.

Sometimes I found myself at a crossroads in the therapy room…and depending on what training or protocol or approach I’m drawing from at that moment informs which path I take.  Sometimes I find myself considering two (or more!) completely opposite next steps- all of them coming out of theory I firmly believe.  How do I reconcile this?!?!

These ponderings led me to sit down with a colleague…for hours……..and put into words MY theoretical non-negotiables.

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I came up with a pretty long list actually and I think I’ll probably write about most of them.  The writing process helps me to uncover further clarity.

Today I’m focusing on my belief- my unchangeable, unflappable belief that All True Selves Are Loveable.

If I’m not seeing my client’s loveable self, I can be confident a protector has come into the room.

So…what next.  What do I do with that awareness???

Well, I think that’s my next article but for now I’ll leave you with my belief that all protectors are adaptive.  They all believe that in some way shape or form they are HELPING the client.  And for that, I must find gratitude.

~

Don’t forget to check out my upcoming training for therapists and helpers on how to incorporate Movement & Music into work with children with complex trauma- encouraging healing from the bottom up.  

Like what you read here?  To get even more support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Mostly I don’t 🙂

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

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