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February 21, 2015

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EMPOWER, EMBRACE, EMERGE Conference

February 11, 2015

Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center is excited to invite you to our 2nd Annual Conference- EMPOWER, EMBRACE, EMERGE- Another Nourishing Conference for Parents and Caregivers!

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We had a BLAST last year at REGULATE, REFUEL, AND RECONNECT and heard the message loud and clear that parents are looking for a conference JUST for them.  You can get training hours- and we love to provide training hours!!!- on parenting a child who has experienced attachment trauma, or any kiddo who has difficulty with relationships and regulation.  But this conference is special- this conference doesn’t focus on what to do to help your kiddo- this conference focuses on what to do to help YOU.  And not only will you get the “what to do” but you’ll have the opportunity to begin to feel and experience it.  BONUS- you’ll be in a room full of parents who totally get it.

DETAILS

WHY ATTEND?

Compassion fatigue and caregiver burnout may be all too familiar on your journey of parenting a child with difficult behaviors.  Over the months and years, the ongoing trauma of parenting may have you feeling as though you have little left to give.  How would you like to spend a day with    other parents who share a similar path and are ready to turn some of those caregiver superpowers on themselves?  Please join Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center (CTATC) for our second   annual conference-EMPOWER, EMBRACE, EMERGE, a Nourishing Conference for Parents and Caregivers.  This soul-enriching day will draw from the latest research and innovation in the fields of neuroscience, mindfulness, and self-compassion to help attendees EMPOWER their mind, body, and soul, EMBRACE themselves (and their child), and EMERGE as a parent more amazing than you ever imagined.

WHAT TO EXPECT

EMPOWER, EMBRACE, EMERGE will be hands-on and interactive, combining learning with experiencing and providing real-world application that you will be able to feel and do in the moment.   You can look forward to meeting new people, hearing others’ stories and experiences, and having the opportunity to share your own.  This will be a day of listening AND doing so come ready to connect with other parents who share a similar parenting journey.  Topics will include self-compassion, radical acceptance, mindfulness, and the power of stories.

When: April 17, 2015; 9am to 3:30pm

Where: Austin, TX- The Settlement Home

Cost: Early bird registration fee of $85/person, with $55 for your second parent partner.

To Register CLICK HERE.

Questions?  Send me an email!  Partial scholarships are available for families in financial need.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

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Like what you read here?  To get more trauma momma support, click here to sign up for my monthly newsletter!

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

 

Free Webinar!! We Adopted- So Why are Things Getting Worse?

February 2, 2015

Just a quick reminder- I’ll be presenting a FREE webinar for Cenpatico EDU on Tuesday February 3 (TOMORROW) at 7pm central time.  This webinar is part 2 of 3 “We adopted- So why are things getting worse?!.”  Part 2 will focus on changes you can make in the environment.  Part 3 will focus on changes that can be made in the family.

Sign up for the Cenpatico Webinar by CLICKING HERE.

Did you miss part 1?  No problem! You can read a summary of the two topics covered on my blog.  The articles aren’t as in-depth as the first webinar but I think it’ll be enough that you will still get a lot out of Parts 2 and 3!

Part 1 focused on two main topics.  Disorganized Attachment and the Window of Tolerance.  To read about Disorganized attachment, CLICK HERE.  To read about the Window of Tolerance, CLICK HERE.

The link to sign up for the Cenpatico Webinar tomorrow is HERE.

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Like what you read here?  To get more trauma momma support, click here to sign up for my monthly newsletter!

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

 

Stop Afternoon Melt-Downs!!

January 25, 2015

Fit.  Tantrum.  Melt-down.  Dysregulated.

Picky eater.

Carb-a-holic.

Do any of these words describe your kiddo?  4pm hits and kids are hitting to proverbial roof.  Or maybe the not-so-proverbial roof in the case of a reallllllly dysregulated kid.

Maintaining regulation in a child with a trauma history is a complex process.  An art, really.  And….lots of luck.  This tip won’t fix all your dysregulation woes, but it may just help.

PROTEIN

So many kiddos I work with are chomping on carbs…carbs…and more carbs.  And fighting with a dysregulated kid about food will likely just lead to more dysregulation.

Two quick little tricks to hide protein in yummy, sweet treats.

Protein Black Bean Brownies.  No, really.  Black beans.  In brownies.  There are lots of recipes on the internet for black bean brownies, but I love this healthy-ingredient option from trauma momma Shelly over a Yearn for Surrender.

No Bake High Energy Bites.  These. Are. So. Amazing.  You can experiment with the recipe.  There is so much sweetness in this recipe that you can easily sub cacao nibs for chocolate chips.  Use 100% nut butter with no sugar added.

Trauma kids power through glucose in their brain realllllly fast because it takes a LOT of energy to be in chronic fight/flight/freeze.  They burn up glucose (sugar) and then their blood sugar plummets, which spikes cortisol, which triggers more fight/flight/freeze.  Etcetera.  Trauma kids are more susceptible to HANGER but frankly, there are lots of kids (and adults) who could use a little extra protein to keep their blood sugar stable- which may ward off a case of the crankies and grumpies.

You’re Welcome :)

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Like what you read here?  To get more trauma momma support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Sometimes I don’t :)

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

Trauma Doesn’t Tell Time- Grand Rapids- Early Bird Extended

July 26, 2014

Yikes, I just realized that my last blog post was about my Austin, TX workshop, and here I am posting now about my Grand Rapids, MI workshop.  I am so sorry!  I try so hard to write blog posts that are helpful, but the summer months are SO hard for me to get in the head space where I can write.

For those of you in West Michigan- just a quick reminder about Trauma Doesn’t Tell Time NEXT Saturday in Grand Rapids, MI.  I extended the early bird rate by a few days so you should be able to get the $50 rate until Monday.

For more information and to register, click HERE.

Thanks for your patience on the marketing blog post instead of the content that you are used to.  I’ll be back on track with writing ASAP!!!  I’m looking so forward to my trip to Grand Rapids, which will be a tiny bit of work and mostly play and fun!!!

In humble gratitude,

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW

Trauma Doesn’t Tell Time- Early Bird Rate Expires Tomorrow!!!

July 3, 2014

If you’re planning to come to Trauma Doesn’t Tell Time next Saturday in Austin, TX, the early bird rate expires tomorrow!!

The venue has been finalized and the workshop will be held at The Settlement Home- 1607 Colony Creek Dr, Bldg. B, Austin, TX 78758. If you attended Regulate, Refuel, and Reconnect in April, it is being held in the same location (fewer attendees though- so we’ll have lots of space!!!).

If you still need to register, you can do so here: REGISTER FOR TRAUMA DOESN’T TELL TIME

Looking forward to seeing you there!
Robyn

The Tragedy of Disorganized Attachment

June 9, 2014

What if your mother was a Tyrannosaurus Rex? You desperately need your mom to keep you safe. You turn to her when you are afraid, you rely on her touch to comfort you. Human babies need mommies (or daddies- a safe, loving caregiver) for survival. What if the one person who could keep you safe was a scary, loud, rough Tyrannosaurus Rex, with a terrifying roar and sharp pointy teeth?

What happens when you come face to face with a velicoraptor? What do you want to do? Where do you want to run? You run to the person who keeps you safe- your mom! So, what if your mom is a Tyrannosaurus Rex? Then what do you do?

Humans are blessed with an attachment system that serves many purposes. The attachment system lays the building blocks for mental health, relationship skills, and self-regulation. The attachment system is also a biological system that ensures our survival. It is through the attachment system that little babies keep their parents close. When babies are distressed, they behave in ways that brings a parent toward them. As babies get older, they move toward their parents- with their legs or with their eyes- seeking out closeness and safety. This system works because parents aren’t supposed to be scary. When a small child is feeling anxious, nervous, uncomfortable, scared, or terrified their attachment system becomes activated and draws them closer to their attachment figure.

When the attachment figure is the source of the anxious, nervous, uncomfortable, scared or terrifying feelings children are left with an unsolvable dilemma. When your fight/flight/freeze system is activated by the SAME person who activates your attachment system, you’ve got a big problem. It is this unsolvable dilemma that is the basis for disorganized attachment.

Hebb’s Axion tells us that “Neurons that fire together wire together.” Children who experience terror, fear, or neglect at the hands of the person who is supposed to keep them safe experience a simultaneous activation of both the attachment system and the fight/flight/freeze system. This simultaneous activation weaves together these experiences in the nervous system, linking these two systems in a deep way.

Over time, in a new, safe home, children’s attachment system begins to be activated by the new, safe caregiver. But due to the previous tangling of the attachment system and the fight/flight/freeze system, this new, safe caregiver activates the attachment system AND the fight/flight/freeze system. Our children become caught in this impossible paradox of “come close, run away.” This horrifying confusion, which leaves children feeling vulnerable, exposed, and at risk of death, is the driving force behind their bizarre and confusing, sometimes dangerous, behaviors.

This entangled circuitry- of attachment and fight/flight/freeze- can be slowly untangled overtime. It is a slow, methodical process which solidifies our understanding of the importance of parenting with connection. It is the piece we can turn back to when we begin to doubt “trust-based parenting” (Purvis & Cross, TCU) because it reminds us that we must never be sources of fright or terror to our children. That if we become triggered and behave in ways we regret- with a spanking or a threat or any attempt at gaining better behavior through fear or coercion, that it is imperative to repair that breech and continue to repattern our children’s nervous system. We cannot simply reassure our children that we are safe. We must prove to them- over and over and over again- that we are safe. We must commit to never reinforcing in their nervous system that “attachment figure” and “danger danger” goes together.

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Like what you read here?  To get more trauma momma support, click here to sign up for my newsletter! I try to send it out monthly. Sometimes I succeed. Sometimes I don’t
J

Robyn Gobbel, LCSW is a child and family therapist in Austin, Texas specializing in adoption, trauma, and attachment counseling. She is the founder of the Central Texas Attachment & Trauma Center.

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